The personal website of Scott W Harden
June 13th, 2009

UCF Tailgate June 2009

This morning I woke up at 4:45am, hopped out of bed, and raced to the university parking lot for field day. It's pretty much a flea market with an emphasis in ham radio and associated electronics. This is a panorama of the parking lot the tailgate was held in, taken from the roof of a parking garage at about 9am. The UCF ARC (the amateur radio club which sponsored the event) is stationed under the white tent.

My goal was to purchase a [working] oscilloscope, and I lucked-out. I ended-up purchasing two, and I'm glad I did! The 1st one (the one with the green circular screen) crapped-out on me after literally 1 minute. (By crapped-out I mean it started spurring thick gray smoke and made my whole apartment smell like a burned marshmallow). At $5, I'm not crying over it. The second one is a 1969 Tektronix 561A 10 MHz oscilloscope. Just think, these things just started started being produced the same year Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. I tested it and it seems to be functioning well. At $10, I'm very happy!

Here you can see it attached to my prime number generator described in agonizingly-boring detail over the last several weeks' posts. It's attached to one of the microcontroller pins responsible for multiplexing the LED display. Finally, a way to assess high speed power output as a function of time. The output of the microcontroller isn't performing like I expected, and since it's a series of pulses I can't use a volt meter to measure its output. Thus, the need [more like desire] for an oscilloscope.

Markdown source code last modified on January 18th, 2021
---
title: UCF Tailgate June 2009
date: 2009-06-13 17:14:08
---

# UCF Tailgate June 2009

<div class="text-center img-border">

[![](ucf_tailgate_2009_thumb.jpg)](ucf_tailgate_2009.jpg)

</div>

__This morning I woke up at 4:45am__, hopped out of bed, and raced to the university parking lot for field day. It's pretty much a flea market with an emphasis in ham radio and associated electronics. This is a panorama of the parking lot the tailgate was held in, taken from the roof of a parking garage at about 9am. The [UCF ARC](www.k4ucf.ucf.edu/) (the amateur radio club which sponsored the event) is stationed under the white tent.

<div class="text-center img-border">

[![](scopes_thumb.jpg)](scopes.jpg)

</div>

__My goal was to purchase a \[working\] oscilloscope__, and I lucked-out. I ended-up purchasing two, and I'm glad I did! The 1st one (the one with the green circular screen) crapped-out on me after literally 1 minute. (By crapped-out I mean it started spurring thick gray smoke and made my whole apartment smell like a burned marshmallow). At $5, I'm not crying over it. The second one is a [1969 Tektronix 561A 10 MHz oscilloscope](http://www.barrytech.com/tektronix/vintage/tek561a.html). Just think, these things just started started being produced the same year Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. I tested it and it seems to be functioning well. At $10, I'm very happy!

<div class="text-center img-border">

[![](scope_box_thumb.jpg)](scope_box.png)

</div>

__Here you can see it attached to my prime number generator__ described in agonizingly-boring detail over the last several weeks' posts. It's attached to one of the microcontroller pins responsible for multiplexing the LED display. Finally, a way to assess high speed power output as a function of time. The output of the microcontroller isn't performing like I expected, and since it's a series of pulses I can't use a volt meter to measure its output. Thus, the need \[more like desire\] for an oscilloscope.